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Cradle of Aviation Museum Air and Space Gala

November 21, 2013
Apollo 9 Crew
Apollo 9 Crew

This week, members of M3 Technology’s leadership team were happy to attend the 11th Annual  Air and Space Gala at Long Island’s Cradle of Aviation Museum.  The Gala “helps to support the development of new activities and educational programs, and honors the accomplishments of leaders in aerospace and technology.”

Among the honorees were James A. McDivitt, and Russell Schweickart, the Commander and Lunar Module Pilot for the Apollo 9 Mission launched by NASA in March of 1969.  This mission was critical in the development of procedures and testing of systems needed for the eventual moon landing.  During the ten day mission the two astronauts and crew mate David Scott tested a number of critical systems, including the LM engines, backpack life support systems, navigation systems, and docking maneuvers.

The two men shared their stories at the gala and brought their audience (many of whom were veterans of the space program in their own right – employees and retired members of Grumman and other key contractors) back to those 10 days when a nation’s energies and treasure were committed to placing men on the moon.  Neil Armstrong famously took “one small step,” but he would not have gotten very far without the work of men like McDivitt, Schweickart, and all of those who helped put them in orbit.

 


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One Last Flight

July 8, 2011
STS 135
STS 135

Today, for the final time, the Space Shuttle Atlantis lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Since the early 80’s the Shuttle has carried men and woman from around the world into Earth orbit. It has lofted satellites and space stations, astronauts and scientists. The Space Shuttle has been the workhorse of the US Space Program for 3 decades, and has flown on for much longer than originally planned.

The Shuttle has been the most visible symbol of mankind’s exploration of the frontier; the latest vehicle reaching toward the unknown and a prime force driving new discoveries. From the Vikings to Columbus, Chinese mariners and Arctic explorers, humanity has always striven to push back the boundaries of the known world, and reach farther and higher than ever before. For 30 years, the Shuttle has been one of the key tools in that endeavor, and its legacy will live on long after Atlantis touches down in a few days.

Despite the disasters of Challenger and Colombia, the great enterprise of space exploration has continued. Spurred by the tragic lessons of those flights, NASA and private enterprise have continued to refine and improve space flight. New designs will emerge in the next decade to take the place of the retiring Space Shuttle, and these will continue the journey beyond the frontier to the moon, the planets, and the rest of the solar system.

This, the final flight of Atlantis, will mark the end of but one chapter in the story of human exploration; while untold opportunities still await. For as long as humanity reaches for the stars, probes the mysteries of the universe, and keeps pushing forward, the spirit of Atlantis, and the men and woman who she lifted into orbit, will live on.


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A Space Race for a New Era

October 11, 2010
Soyuz Launch
Soyuz Launch

More than fifty years ago, the United States and Soviet Union engaged in a great contest of engineering and scientific endeavor known as the space race. The achievements by both nations during this time are well-know and came through hard-fought effort.  From Sputnik to Apollo, each side had its share of triumph and tragedy in the stars and on the launch pad. While this era in space exploration was typical of the contentious nature of the times and the hair trigger rivalry between the Superpowers, it has since given way to a much more collaborative age of exploration and scientific inquiry.

The latest example of cooperation occurred this past week, when a Russian-made rocket and capsule launched from Kazakhstan to deliver a new crew of Russians and Americans to the International Space Station (itself the product of a shared effort by many nations).  This crew will be supplemented and supplied later in the year when the American-made Space Shuttle Discovery docks with the station.

The ideals of teamwork and mutual effort are the future of space exploration, and will be the driving forces behind probing the solar system and beyond.  M3 Technology is proud to be a part of this new effort, and to support aerospace operations around the world. M3 counts on a supply base as diverse and wide-ranging as the one that lifted the ISS into orbit, and M3 products are in use around the world every day. From Cape Canaveral to the Baikonur Cosmodrome and everywhere in between, M3 embraces, supports and counts on the spirit of international cooperation which has emerged in the early 21st century.